UCL are the Rosetrees 2016 Interdisciplinary Prize Winners!

Posted on: May 27th, 2016

Rosetrees is pleased to announce UCL as the winner of our 2016 Interdisciplinary Prize. This year the award aims to stimulate research at the interface of Maths/Computer Science and Medicine.  Applications were invited from 15 leading research institutes from across the UK and Israel. After a rigorous peer review process, UCL was ranked first, with the University of Newcastle and Imperial College London the runners up.

The winning project, led by Dr Simon Walker Samuel from the UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging and Dr Rebecca Shipley from UCL Mechanical Engineering will use a computational approach to predict improvements for T-cell therapy in pancreatic cancer.

They will perform powerful computational simulations to investigate the treatment of pancreatic cancer with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. In this therapy, T-cells are extracted from the blood and reprogrammed to target specific molecules within the tumour. Despite remarkable success in treating leukaemia, a number of barriers are thought to limit its efficacy for solid tumours.

Sophisticated imaging of the tumour and its microenvironment will enable Dr Walker-Samuel and Dr Shipley to develop simulations to evaluate the key barriers that limit T-cell therapeutic efficacy, and model processes that would be challenging in conventional experimental settings.

Dr Shipley said ‘We are absolutely delighted to have won the 2016 Rosetrees Interdisciplinary Prize, which will enable us to take our approach to the next level in terms of informing novel cancer treatments. We are indebted to the Rosetrees for investing in this kind of cross-disciplinary research, and UCL for creating the environment to support it.’

Rosetrees is proud to be supporting flagship interdisciplinary research projects that harness the skills of different disciplines. Rosetrees believes this is crucial in biomedical research in the 21st Century.

 

Blood vessels in a mouse colorectal xenograft model, acquired using optical projection tomography, and colour-coded by vessel size

Blood vessels in a mouse colorectal xenograft model, acquired using optical projection tomography, and colour-coded by vessel size

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